Make Your Next Trip Extraordinary

The Countries That Have Reopened to U.S. Travelers and What You’ll Find There

by Brook Wilkinson | July 15, 2020

Travel restrictions around the world are starting to ease, but it can be confusing and time-consuming to figure out where U.S. residents are welcome to visit without having to quarantine on arrival. (If you’re wondering what restrictions are in place for travel within the U.S., check out this companion article: Every State’s Coronavirus and Travel Information.) When the world seemed to be opening up in June, we saw Iceland, Portugal, and Greece change their minds about when they would let in American travelers—right before the entire European Union came to an agreement to prohibit U.S. travelers and admit visitors only from an approved list of 15 countries. (That list is Algeria, Australia, Canada, China, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, and Uruguay.)

So we’ve created this single resource where we’ll be sharing all the important details as destinations open their borders to U.S. residents, including the relevant health and safety guidelines each government has enacted, as well as on-the-ground intel from our network of travel specialists around the world—all of whom are busy devising and implementing their own protocols to keep travelers healthy, and strategizing ways to improve the travel experience as we navigate the path ahead. It’s interesting to note how widely the guidelines vary from place to place, even just among these destinations that are letting in U.S. residents: Some require multiple negative tests before visitors are allowed to move about freely, while others have no testing or screening in place (each a scenario that some travelers will likely find untenable). In many cases, the short window prior to departure that travelers have to get tested—often just two or three days—makes visiting these places impossible, given the delays and shortages of COVID-19 tests here in the U.S.

Remember that the State Department’s Level 4 Global Health Advisory remains in effect, advising U.S. citizens not to travel abroad. Before you start planning a trip anywhere, we encourage you to check the New York Times’ informative global coronavirus map (the fact that a destination has opened its borders does not mean that it has adeptly handled its own virus outbreak) and to contact us via Ask Wendy to find out which travel specialists have the most up-to-date intel.

We will endeavor to update the information below frequently, but we recommend that you check a destination’s official restrictions before making any travel plans. Useful resources include the websites of U.S. embassies, TripsGuard’s compilation of worldwide restrictions, and the local tourism board.


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Caribbean / Bahamas / Bermuda
Mexico
Europe
Africa and the Middle East
Asia
Australia/Pacific
Delayed Openings

To find the best and most-informed travel specialist for a particular area, Ask Wendy.


Caribbean / Bahamas / Bermuda

Antigua and Barbuda

Travel restrictions:

Health info:

  • Here is the C.D.C advisory.
  • Currently, arriving passengers are encouraged to bring proof of a negative COVID-19 test taken in the last 48 hours. Starting July 10, all visitors (including transiting passengers) must bring proof of a negative RT-PCR test taken in the last seven days. They must complete a health declaration and may be subject to a COVID-19 test at a cost of $100. Those who are tested will have to stay at their hotel and its beach until results are returned in about 96 hours. Visitors must have their own masks to wear in all public areas during their stay.
  • Until July 31, there is a curfew in effect from 11:00 p.m. to 5:00 a.m.
  • Masks are required in all public areas, and people are urged to maintain 6 feet of social distancing.
  • All accommodations (hotels, resorts, rentals, villas) and transportation operators must meet cleaning and safety protocols and be certified by the islands’ health authorities in order to resume service. For example, hotel employees have to live on-property in order to limit their possible exposure to the virus, and taxi drivers will be given time to wash their hands at hotels between passengers.

Local intel:

  • Travelers arriving at the airport must take approved taxis or vans to their accommodations, where they may be able to arrange for a rental car. Taxis and vans are limited to 50% capacity and must be sanitized after each trip.
  • Some restaurants have reopened for dine-in service, but travelers are encouraged to make use only of take-away services.
  • Until July 31, beaches are open from 6:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.; social distancing must be observed.

Aruba

Travel restrictions:

  • Residents of the U.S. are allowed into Aruba as of July 10. 
  • Here is the U.S. State Department advisory.

Health info: 

  • Here is the CDC advisory
  • Travelers are encouraged to arrive with proof of a negative oral/nasal PCR COVID-19 test taken no more than 72 hours prior to departure to Aruba. Those arriving from a number of U.S. states are required to be tested and upload their results at least 12 hours prior to their departure to Aruba. Others may opt instead to be tested at their own expense upon arrival and quarantine in their reserved accommodations for up to 24 hours, until results are returned. Anyone who arrives with negative results will undergo a temperature check and health interview; those showing symptoms will be put in isolation pending test results. Children 14 and under don’t need to be tested or screened.  
  • All visitors must fill out an Embarkation/Disembarkation card online, which includes a personal health assessment and the required purchase of Aruba Visitors Insurance, which will cover any COVID-related medical costs up to $75,000; premiums range from about $100 to $600, depending on age and length of stay. (You can purchase another travel medical insurance policy to supplement this, but not replace it.) 
  • Masks are required on flights to Aruba and in the airport. They are not required while on the island, but visitors are encouraged to keep one handy for times when they can’t socially distance. 

Local intel: 

  • Travel businesses—including accommodations, restaurants, food trucks, casinos, stores, transportation companies, spas, and tour operators—must apply for the Aruba Health & Happiness Code certification, which requires an on-site assessment. 
  • While many hotels are implementing protocols that include plexiglass barriers and contactless check-in, some have made major investments in electrostatic machines and other technology to sanitize their property. 
  • Restaurants are open for indoor and outdoor dining until 10:00 p.m. Bars, nightclubs, and casinos can stay open until 11:00 p.m.
  • Spas have reopened. 
  • The Aruba Health app promises less time spent waiting at the airport, quicker results if you’re tested on the island, and listings of Health & Happiness Code-certified businesses. 

Bahamas

Travel restrictions:

  • The Bahamas opened to yachts and private aircraft as of June 15. The islands are open to commercial flights as of July 1. 
  • Here is the U.S. State Department advisory.

Health info: 

  • Here is the CDC advisory
  • Travelers must apply for an electronic health visa prior to departure, including proof of a negative COVID-19 RT-PCR test taken within 10 days of your travel date (children under 2 are exempt). There will be temperature screenings for incoming travelers; those showing symptoms may be transferred to an on-site quarantine area for further evaluation. 
  • Masks are required in air and sea terminals. Elsewhere, visitors are asked to wear masks when appropriate and maintain physical distancing of three to six feet. 
  • The airport is assigning flights to every other gate

Local intel: 

  • Hotels and rental properties are allowed to open with health protocols in place, including employee temperature checks and limited capacity in elevators. 
  • Hotels, restaurants, and other tourism businesses can apply for “Clean & Pristine” certification; each business must display its own specific protocols. 
  • Restaurants are open with limited capacity and physical distancing, with disposable or chalkboard menus. Staff must wear masks, and buffets are not permitted. 
  • Taxis/car services, ferries, and other vessels are limited to 50% capacity; all car occupants must wear masks and passengers may not sit in the front seat. Ferry staff must wear masks. 
  • Beach chairs must be set up with at least six feet between families. 
  • Tours are operating with limited guests and duration; personal snorkeling gear and the like should be used whenever possible. 
  • Shoppers can not touch items unless they intend to purchase them.

Barbados

Travel restrictions:

Health info: 

  • Here is the CDC advisory
  • Travelers must submit an Embarkation/Disembarkation Form between 72 and 24 hours prior to travel and will need to show their receipt to Immigration and Customs upon arrival. 
  • Travelers (aged six and over) from high-risk countries, including the U.S., should bring proof of a negative PCR test taken within 72 hours of their travel to Barbados. Those who don’t will be tested on arrival; you can wait at a designated hotel for results, which are expected within 24 hours. Travelers from high-risk countries may be monitored for symptoms daily and tested again on Day 7. 
  • There will also be health screenings at the airport; masks are required. 

Local intel: 

  • Beaches and parks are open. 
  • Gatherings of up to 500 people are allowed; social distancing of three feet is recommended.

Belize

Travel restrictions:

  • Belize’s international airport reopens on August 15. 
  • Here is the U.S. State Department advisory.

Health info: 

  • Here is the CDC advisory
  • Visitors must complete a form on the Belize Health app within 72 hours of boarding their flight; those who arrive with negative results from a PCR test taken within the same time window will be eligible for fast-track entry. Travelers from high-risk countries (including the U.S.) who do not come with negative test results will be tested on arrival—and quarantined, should they test positive—at their own expense. Results are expected in 15 to 30 minutes. 
  • All arriving passengers will have to walk through thermal scanners at the airport. 
  • Everyone must wear masks in public places, including the airport. 

Local intel: 

  • Initially, only those hotels that have earned the country’s Tourism Gold Standard Certificate of Recognition will open; restaurants and tour operators must follow these guidelines as well, which include social distancing, enhanced cleaning, and contactless service. Hotels must also provide all services to guests (transportation, a restaurant, a pool or beach access, and tour options for guests) in order to limit interaction with local communities. 
  • Rental cars are not available for international visitors. 
  • Archaeological sites and national parks will have capacity restrictions, with tours by appointment. 
  • Hotel spas are open, but high-contact treatments involving the face are discouraged. 
  • A yacht charter is a relatively safe, sanitized, and socially distanced way to relax and enjoy the Caribbean Sea that flows around Belize. We know yachts whose crews have at least 14 days between charters (and thus between contact with guests) and are sanitized in line with the Gold Standard guidelines. Write to Ask Wendy for details.

Bermuda

Travel restrictions:

  • Bermuda opened its borders on July 1; the first flight from the U.S. takes off on July 6. 
  • Here is the U.S. State Department advisory.

Health info: 

  • Here is the CDC advisory
  • Before leaving home, travelers must complete a travel authorization and pay a $75 fee, which includes the cost of in-country testing (children 9 and under don’t need to be tested and will be charged a $30 fee). 
  • Visitors aged 10 and up who are coming from a country with community transmission of COVID-19—including the U.S.—must get a RT-PCR COVID-19 test no more than five days prior to departure, ideally within 72 hours. (Those aged 10 to 17 can get a saliva test; those under 10 are exempt.) All arriving passengers will be tested on arrival and must isolate at their hotel until results are returned, usually in 6 to 8 hours. All visitors must be tested again at a pop-up site on Day 3, Day 7, and Day 14 of their trip (as applicable); appointments are encouraged, and you do not have to wait for results. Visitors are asked to log their temperature and any symptoms twice a day. 
  • Arriving passengers are asked to wear masks while traveling to their departure airport, practice physical distancing at that airport, and wear masks during flights and on arrival. Checked luggage will be disinfected before pickup at baggage claim.  
  • Visitors must wear masks indoors (as well as outdoors when physical distancing cannot be maintained), practice social distancing in all public places where there is close contact with others—including on ferries and in taxis—and report their temperature twice a day. 

Local intel: 

  • Some hotels have reopened, with health protocols in place. 
  • Bars and nightclubs will be open, with social distancing. 
  • Spas are open, subject to public health guidelines. 
  • Gatherings of up to 50 people are allowed. 
  • Scuba diving is permitted. 
  • Starting July 1, there is a curfew in effect from midnight to 5:00 a.m.

Dominican Republic

Travel restrictions:

  • The Dominican Republic opened its borders on July 1. 
  • Here is the U.S. State Department advisory.

Health info: 

  • Here is the CDC advisory
  • It is mandatory to maintain social distancing and wear masks in all public spaces. 
  • Punta Cana Airport has installed temperature sensors, expanded immigration lanes, boarding-pass readers for direct passenger use, and reduced bus capacity by 50-60%; masks are required. Passengers who opt for V.I.P. service will disembark from the plane to a golf cart; capacity has been reduced in the V.I.P. lounge. 

Local intel: 

  • Roughly half of the island’s hotels will reopen in July
  • Restaurants are allowed to reopen.

Jamaica

Travel restrictions:

  • On June 15, Jamaica entered Phase 1 of its reopening, during which tourists must stay in the coastal corridor between Negril and Port Antonio; only businesses that have been cleared may open.
  • Here is the U.S. State Department advisory.

Health info:

  • Here is the C.D.C advisory.
  • Before departing the U.S., travelers must complete an online form that asks about your health and in-country contact information. Those who are deemed to be at risk of having COVID-19 will not receive a travel authorization, which will be required to board a flight to Jamaica. Starting July 10, travelers from New York, Florida, Arizona, and Texas will also need to upload proof of a negative PCR test taken within 10 days of your arrival in Jamaica.
  • Arriving passengers will be screened and have their temperature taken and, if showing symptoms or coming from a high-risk country, will be tested free of charge. Those who are tested must await results at their hotel.
  • Travelers who wish to leave the tourism corridor must be tested for COVID-19.
  • All are required to wear masks and maintain social distancing.
  • Through July 31, there is a curfew in effect from 11:00 p.m. to 5:00 a.m.

Local intel:

  • All tourism businesses, including hotels, attractions, and transportation companies, must abide by a lengthy set of guidelines issued by the Ministry of Tourism.
  • Restaurants are open only for take-out and outdoor service.
  • Bars are open with protocols in place.

Puerto Rico

Travel restrictions:

  • Puerto Rico opens to visitors on July 15. 
  • The U.S. State Department does not advise on travel to Puerto Rico, as it is a territory of the U.S.

Health info: 

  • Here is the CDC advisory
  • Visitors must complete a travel declaration form. If they do not provide proof of a negative molecular COVID-19 test taken within the past 72 hours, they will be given a free rapid test at the airport and required to quarantine until they receive negative results for a molecular test taken on the island. Thermal screenings will also be conducted, and San Juan Airport has enacted a number of sanitization and social-distancing protocols. 
  • Masks and social distancing are required, including at the airport. Masks are also required and passengers may not sit in the front seat  in taxis and other shared vehicles. 
  • Through July 22, there is a curfew in effect from 10:00 p.m. to 5:00 a.m.

Local intel: 

  • All tourism businesses, including hotels, must by a set of mandatory health and safety guidelines that include temperature checks and cleaning to C.D.C. and E.P.A. standards; businesses can choose to be endorsed by the Puerto Rico Tourism Company that they meet or exceed these standards. 
  • Restaurants are open at 75% capacity; anyone entering will have their temperature checked and will be disallowed if the reading is over 100.3 degrees. All employees must wear masks, and also gloves when serving guests. Buffets, salad bars, self-serve options, and reusable menus are banned. 
  • Spas, museums, and theaters are open at 75% capacity. 
  • Casinos are open at 75% capacity with temperature checks and hand sanitation required when entering and gaming stations disinfected every hour and after each guest leaves. Both employees and guests are required to wear masks, and also gloves when at gaming tables.  
  • Shopping malls are open with social distancing and appointments required to enter. 
  • Public beaches, nature reserves, and golf courses are open for recreation and sunbathing, but not for gatherings of people from multiple households. El Yunque National Forest is partially open with limited capacity and reservations required. 
  • Limited ferry service is available to Vieques and Culebra.

St. Barts

Travel restrictions: 

  • St. Barts opened to all non-essential travelers on June 22. Flights are currently available via San Juan and Antigua; starting July 15, travelers will also be able to reach St. Barts via air, ferry, or private-boat service from Sint Maarten.
  • Here is the U.S. State Department advisory.

Health info:

  • Here is the C.D.C. advisory.
  • Until July 10, visitors 10 years of age and older must either bring proof of a negative COVID-19 test administered within 72 hours of their arrival, or be tested within 24 hours of their arrival on the island at a cost of 135 euros. Those who choose the latter option must strictly quarantine in their hotel room or villa until results are returned (a 24-hour turnaround time has been promised). Starting July 10, visitors will be required to show a negative RT-PCR test with a result dated within 72 hours of their arrival.
  • Those staying more than seven days must be tested again on Day 7. Anyone who tests positive will be required to quarantine for 14 days or until they test negative.
  • Travelers must also be tested when departing St. Barts, as the connecting airports require proof of negative test results within 72 hours of travel.
  • Tradewind Aviation, which operates between San Juan and St. Barts, requires that passengers wear masks and fill out a health questionnaire prior to flying; those who answer “yes” to any question will not be allowed onboard unless they can show a negative test result in the last two days.
  • All are encouraged to practice social distancing and wear masks in enclosed public places (some businesses require them, as does the airport).

Local intel:

  • Many hotels will not be reopening until the fall; until then, a private villa may be the best option.
  • Restaurants are open with increased distancing; a few are offering take-away service.
  • Boutiques are operating as normal.
  • Beaches are open with no restrictions; social distancing is encouraged.

St. Lucia

Travel restrictions:

Health info:

  • Here is the C.D.C advisory.
  • Visitors currently must provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test taken within the 48 hours prior to their arrival; starting July 9, tests within 7 days of travel will be allowed. Travelers must also complete a Pre-Arrival Registration Form and have confirmed reservations at COVID-certified accommodations. The airport is doing temperature checks and luggage sanitization.
  • There is a curfew in effect from midnight to 5:00 a.m.
  • Masks are required in all public places, including at hotels.
  • The hotels that have been certified to reopen have nurses’ stations and quarantine facilities on site, and are implementing temperature checks of employees daily and of guests at every meal.

Local intel:

  • The hiking paths on the Pitons are open; the mud baths at Sulfur Springs are not.
  • Beaches are open. Travelers are encouraged to bring their own snorkeling gear; dive centers remain closed. Hotel staff are ensuring that guests maintain social distancing on their beaches.
  • Car-rental agencies are closed, though taxis are available. Helicopter transfers are not operating.
  • Spas are closed.
  • Some restaurants have reopened, but only for delivery and take-away service.
  • Some shops are open, with limited numbers allowed in at once.

U.S. Virgin Islands

Travel restrictions:

  • The U.S.V.I. opened to all international travelers on June 1. Starting July 15, travelers aged 15 and older from states with a positivity rate greater than 10% (but not travelers transiting through those states) will need to bring proof of either a negative antigen test taken in the five days prior to travel, or a positive antibody test taken within the past four months. (Those who don’t will have to quarantine for 14 days or until they test negative.) Visitors must fill out a health screening questionnaire upon arrival and have their temperature taken. Anyone testing 100.4 degrees or higher on two checks taken ten minutes apart, or who has answered “yes” to any of the screening questions, will be quarantined at their hotel until they have been tested.
  • The U.S. State Department does not advise on travel to the U.S.V.I., as they are a territory of the U.S.

Health info:

  • Here is the C.D.C advisory.
  • Travelers are asked to keep masks, gloves, and hand sanitizer with them at all times.
  • Masks must be worn on flights and in airports and when entering most businesses, but not in restaurants or on beaches.
  • Certain businesses, including some hotels, require temperature checks before entering.

Local intel:

  • All businesses except casinos, gaming facilities, bars, and nightclubs are open.
  • Restaurants’ capacity is limited to 50% or 50 people (whichever is lower); they must place tables at least 6 feet apart and seat no more than six in a party. Counter service is not allowed, and alcohol cannot be sold after 11:00 p.m. Staff must wear masks.
  • Taxis and vans are limited to half their normal capacity.
  • Beaches are open but social distancing must be maintained, and they are off-limits between 4:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m. on weekends and holidays.
  • Gatherings of more than 10 people are not allowed. All island-wide festivals for 2020 have been canceled.

 


Mexico

Travel restrictions:

  • While the land border between the U.S. and Mexico remains closed, flights between the two countries have continued to operate throughout the pandemic (though at much lower frequency). On June 16, the U.S. ambassador to Mexico stated that “now is not the time for tourism.”
  • Here is the U.S. State Department advisory.

Health info:

  • Here is the C.D.C advisory.
  • As in the U.S., the caseload of—and the response to—COVID-19 has varied greatly among Mexico’s states. The national government never mandated mask wearing, though several state governments have done so. Mexico City has been the epicenter of the country’s outbreak.
  • Travelers arriving by plane may be subject to health screenings and temperature checks; those exhibiting symptoms may be required to quarantine.

Local intel:

  • The government of Baja California Sur (home to Cabo San Lucas and San Jose del Cabo) has allowed hotels, restaurants, and beaches to open at 25-30% capacity. Private activities are operating, including fishing charters in waters that haven’t been fished for months.
  • The state of Jalisco (home to Puerto Vallarta) is allowing hotels to operate at 25% capacity; their pools, beach clubs, and restaurants can open, but not gyms or spas. The beaches immediately in front of hotels will be open to guests. Restaurants can operate at 50% capacity. Bars and nightclubs are closed.
  • In Nayarit (home to Punta Mita), hotels can operate at 30% capacity, with social distancing in common areas and pools.
  • Quintana Roo, which includes Cancun, Tulum, and Cozumel, has allowed hotels to open at 30% capacity; hotel beaches have opened.
  • Sonora’s governor has imposed stay-at-home orders on the state’s 12 major cities; U.S. citizens are not allowed on the state’s beaches. Other state-by-state restrictions are listed on the U.S. embassy’s website.
  • Museums and Mayan ruins throughout the country have not yet reopened.

 


Europe

Belarus

Travel restrictions:

Health info: 

Croatia

Travel restrictions:

Health info: 

  • Here is the CDC advisory
  • Masks and social distancing are encouraged.

Kosovo

Travel restrictions:

Health info: 

North Macedonia

Travel restrictions:

Health info: 

  • Here is the CDC advisory
  • Two-meter social distancing is required in public; masks are required in closed public spaces, as well as open spaces where distancing is not possible. 
  • No groups larger than two people are allowed in public (except children under 14 with their parents). 
  • Departing passengers must arrive at the airport at least three hours prior to their flight and wear a mask. Those with a temperature above 99.1 degrees or other symptoms may not be allowed into the airport or on their flight. 

Local intel: 

  • Restaurants and bars that have implemented certain protocols are open for indoor and outdoor service. 
  • Public transportation is limited.

Serbia

Travel restrictions:

Health info: 

  • Here is the CDC advisory
  • All are strongly advised to practice social distancing and use personal protection such as masks and gloves, particularly on public transit and while indoors in public. 

Local intel: 

  • There are no government regulations regarding hotels, but some 4- and 5-star properties are implementing more frequent cleaning with stronger anti-viral products, replacing breakfast buffets with a la carte ordering, and requiring that staff wear masks.
  • Restaurants, cafes, and most businesses are open. 
  • Some businesses have security guards restricting the number of people allowed inside.
  • Indoor public gatherings are limited to 500 people; there are no restrictions on outdoor gatherings. 

Turkey

Travel restrictions:

  • Turkey reopened its borders on June 1. 
  • Here is the U.S. State Department advisory.

Health info: 

  • Here is the CDC advisory
  • Masks are mandatory in all public areas, including on all flights and in airports. 
  • Travelers must fill out a form with their contact information while in-country and undergo a health screening upon arrival; those with symptoms will be tested for COVID-19, with results promised in three hours. Anyone who tests positive will be taken to a private hospital for treatment. 
  • It is recommended that travelers bring proof of a health-insurance policy that would cover any required medical care.
  • Passengers will be screened—and tested if showing symptoms of COVID-19—before every flight (both international and domestic). 
  • The Ministry of Aviation has implemented strict sanitizing protocols in airports; passports will be UV-cleaned before being given to customs officers.

Local intel: 

  • Hotels must be certified by the Ministry of Health and can operate at no more than 50% occupancy; some have installed thermal scanners.
  • Restaurants have reopened with reduced capacity and staff wearing masks, face shields, and gloves. 
  • Turkey’s Safe Tourism Certification Program requires an on-site inspection before applying its seal to a hotel or restaurant.
  • Museums are open, with social-distancing measures in place. The Istanbul Modern, for example, is limiting capacity to 70 visitors at a time, taking visitors’ temperature before entering, and requiring masks while inside. Ephesus, which used to allow 40,000 visitors at a time, has slashed that figure to 650. After-hours tours are possible at the Hagia Sophia. 
  • The underground cistern in Istanbul and underground cities in Cappadocia remain closed.
  • At the beach, sunbeds are spaced at least two meters apart; some resorts have private beach areas where you can reserve sunbeds and cabanas. Masks are required when walking on the beach, but not when seated.
  • Balloon flights are scheduled to resume October 1, with reduced occupancy.
  • All airport lounges are closed.

Ukraine

Travel restrictions:

  • Ukraine has opened its borders to international travelers, while also extending some quarantine measures for residents and visitors until July 31. 
  • Here is the U.S. State Department advisory.

Health info: 

  • Here is the CDC advisory
  • Citizens of red-zone countries—those with more than 40 active cases per 100,000 people, which includes the U.S.—must self-quarantine for 14 days or take a PCR COVID-19 test during their first 24 hours in the country and isolate until results arrive in 24 to 48 hours. 
  • Travelers must have a Health Insurance Certificate that covers costs related to COVID-19 and is issued by a company registered in Ukraine; policies are also available at VisitUkraine
  • Travelers must download the Dii Vdoma tracking app and register with a Ukranian mobile number before going through passport control; the app is currently only available in Ukrainian. 
  • Masks are required in all public places (except for children under 6 years old). 

Local intel: 

  • Hotels, restaurants, public transportation, and swimming pools are open in most regions of the country, as well as inter-region train routes, all with social distancing requirements. 
  • Hotel lobbies are limited to one person per 10 square meters; masks and 1.5 meters of social distancing are required in hotels (except in your own room).

 


Africa and the Middle East

Benin

Travel restrictions:

  • Benin’s Cotonou Cadjehoun Airport is open, though entry visas may be restricted. 
  • Here is the U.S. State Department advisory.

Health info: 

Dubai

Travel restrictions:

  • Dubai opens to international travelers on July 7. The rest of the United Arab Emirates, including Abu Dhabi, remain closed. 
  • Here is the U.S. State Department advisory for the U.A.E.

Health info: 

  • Here is the CDC advisory for the U.A.E. 
  • Travelers must complete a Health Declaration Form, have medical insurance, and sign a declaration that they will cover the cost of quarantine and treatment if needed. 
  • Visitors must register with the Dubai Health Authority’s COVID-19 DXB app.
  • All arriving passengers will have their temperature taken. Those who can’t show proof of a negative COVID-19 test taken no more than 96 hours prior to their date of travel—as well as anyone currently showing symptoms—will be tested on arrival. Anyone testing positive must quarantine for 14 days. 
  • Everyone in Dubai is required to wear masks when around others outdoors and maintain two meters of social distancing. 
  • In the airport, gloves and masks are required; lounges are closed. Protective plexiglass has been installed at check-in and immigration counters. 

Local intel: 

Egypt

Travel restrictions:

  • All airports will reopen for international flights starting July 1. (EgyptAir will commence flight operations from JFK on July 1, and from IAD Washington-Dulles on July 2.)
  • However, tourists are only allowed at three seaside resort regions: southern Sinai (where the Sharm el-Sheikh and Dahab resorts are), Red Sea province (where the Hurghada and Marsa Alam resorts are), and Marsa Matrouh on the Mediterranean. These areas chosen by the government because of their low coronavirus statistics and the presence of public and private hospitals. Travel between these three areas, or from these areas to other parts of Egypt, is not allowed.
  • Here is the U.S. State Department advisory.

Health info:

  • Here is the C.D.C. advisory.
  • Travelers must fill out a health declaration form prior to receiving their boarding pass to travel to Egypt.
  • If you’re arriving from a country with a high-infection rate, you will have to show proof of a negative COVID-19 test taken within the 48 hours prior to your travel date to Egypt. This list is not yet finalized.
  • Travelers must provide proof of health insurance policy upon arrival.
  •  Masks are required in public places, inside airports, and on EgyptAir flights.
  • Travelers who have minor cases of COVID-19 will be quarantined on a special floor of their hotel at the cost of the hotel, and treatment will be covered by the Ministry of Health and Population. Travelers who have severe cases will be hospitalized, also at the cost of the government.

Local intel:

  • Hospitality establishments, tourism activities, archeological sites and museums must earn a government-issued Hygiene Safety Certificate before opening to visitors. Certified establishments undergo routine inspections. Criteria include mandatory temperature checks for guests every time they enter the premises (that goes for hotels, museums, and archaeological sites), luggage disinfection, protective gear kits in each room, various cleaning criteria, and an on-call doctor and a clinic at hotels.
  • Restaurants, cafes, sports clubs and movie theaters are open at 25 percent capacity.
  • Hotels are operating at 50 percent capacity.
  • Restaurants and cafes must close by 10 p.m.; other shops must close by 9 p.m.
  • Places of worship are open for daily prayers from Sunday to Thursday and closed on Friday and Saturday.
  • Public parks and beaches are closed.

Rwanda

Travel restrictions:

  • Though Rwanda’s borders opened to charter flights only on June 17, traveling there remains largely infeasible: All neighboring countries remain closed to international flights, and a charter flight from Nairobi would cost at least $13,000 each way. Commercial flights are expected to resume in July.
  • Here is the U.S. State Department advisory.

Health info: 

  • Here is the CDC advisory
  • Arriving passengers should carry proof of a negative COVID-19 test taken no more than 72 hours prior to arriving in Rwanda; all visitors will then be tested again upon arrival and must await their results at one of three hotels in Kigali (the expected turnaround time is eight hours). Those who can’t be tested before arrival will need to take a second test 48 hours after arrival. Travelers must stay at their hotel until presenting two negative tests, and those who test positive will be quarantined at a government facility. 
  • Masks must be worn in public at all times, including at the airport. 
  • There is a curfew in effect from 9:00 p.m. to 5:00 a.m.
  • Staff at national parks and accommodations must be tested for COVID-19 every two weeks.   

Local intel: 

  • Tourism activities were permitted to open as of June 17, with social distancing and other protocols required. 
  • Restaurants are open under social-distancing guidelines. 
  • Visitors must maintain a distance of at least 10 meters while visiting primates in Nyungwe and Volcanoes national parks. 

Tanzania

Travel restrictions:

  • Tanzania’s borders are open to all travelers. 
  • Here is the U.S. State Department advisory.

Health info: 

  • Here is the CDC advisory
  • Tanzania’s government has refused to release official figures on its COVID-19 caseload; as a result, Kenya and Zambia have closed their borders with the country, and some safari operators are choosing not to open their lodges and camps in the country. 
  • Passengers have to fill out a Health Surveillance Form and will be subject to an intensive health screening and sanitization on arrival, and possibly a COVID-19 test. 
  • Masks are recommended in public; they are required at the airport, where social distancing is also being enacted. 
  • Those showing symptoms of COVID-19 will be required to quarantine unless they can show proof of a negative test. 
  • Auric Air, which flies to some of the country’s most remote safari destinations, has enacted a number of safety protocols—including taking passengers’ temperatures prior to boarding.
  • Tourism entities must appoint a COVID-19 liaison officer to ensure that protocols are in place and preventative measures taken. 

Local intel: 

  • Most restaurants, cafes, and bars in mainland Tanzania remain closed; some are offering take-out service. Zanzibar’s Minister of Tourism reports that all of the island’s tourist hotels, restaurants, and bars are open
  • There is a ban on public gatherings. 
  • The top safari camps and lodges that have opened are implementing a range of strict protocols, including testing or quarantining all staff before coming on duty, taking staff members’ temperature daily and guests’ on arrival, appointing dedicated staff members and guides to serve each group of travelers, and utilizing private safari vehicles or leaving the middle row of seats open.

Asia

The Maldives

Travel restrictions:

Health info: 

  • Here is the CDC advisory
  • Passengers must submit a health declaration card and have their temperature taken on arrival. Anyone showing symptoms, or who has been in contact with a confirmed case of COVID-19 in the previous 14 days, will be tested at their own cost and will be quarantined at their resort (if allowed) or at an isolation facility. People in close contact with the symptomatic individual during travel may also be quarantined. Random testing may also be done at no cost. Masks and social distancing are required at the airport. 
  • Visitors are encouraged to install the TraceEkee app, which aids in contact tracing. 
  • Travelers will be screened again when departing their accommodations, and tested if showing symptoms. 

Local intel: 

  • Resorts, hotels, and liveaboards located on uninhabited islands can open starting July 15; guest houses and hotels located on inhabited islands can open starting August 1 (with an exception for travelers awaiting transfer to a property on an uninhabited island).  
  • The Soneva Fushi and Soneva Jhani resorts will be testing all guests, who must stay in their villas until results arrive in six to 24 hours. Anyone who tests positive may stay in their villa at no room charge for the next 14 days. 

Australia/Pacific

Tahiti and French Polynesia

Travel restrictions:

Health info: 

  • Here is the CDC advisory
  • Prior to boarding their flight, travelers must show airline staff proof of a negative RT-PCR test taken within 72 hours of their flight and the receipt showing they filled out a health registration form during the same time period. This form includes a requirement that all travelers have insurance to cover any COVID-19 expenses, or that they will personally assume all such expenses.  
  • Travelers must perform a self-test on their fourth day in French Polynesia; this kit will be provided on arrival.
  • Masks are recommended for travelers ages 11 and up.

 


 

Delayed Openings

Greece

Travel restrictions:

  • Greece retracted its original announcement that it would open to all travelers starting June 15; it is currently open to citizens of the E.U. and a few other European countries. Restrictions may change on July 1, but specifics haven’t yet been announced.
  • Here is the U.S. State Department advisory.

Health info:

  • Here is the C.D.C. advisory.
  • Masks are recommended in public indoor areas and required on all public transportation (including ferries, taxis, buses, and the metro). Ferries are operating at 50% capacity, with only one passenger or family allowed in each cabin.
  • All crew and passengers are required to wear masks on domestic flights. Aegean Airlines is leaving three rows open on every flight for any passengers who display symptoms of COVID-19.
  • The Greek Tourism Ministry has issued an extensive set of guidelines that hotels must follow.

Local intel:

  • Restaurants, cafes, and bars are limited to one customer per two square meters of indoor and outdoor space. Employees must wear masks.
  • Museums are open with limits on how many people can enter each hour; visitors must maintain two meters of distance from each other. Many museums will likely sell timed-entry tickets online and offer walk-up tickets only if still available. After-hours tours are available from in-the-know sources.
  • Open-air archaeological sites such as the Acropolis are also limiting entry to maintain social distancing; timed-entry tickets can be purchased online. Specific routes around the sites have been demarcated, and Plexiglass screens installed in some places.
  • Open-air cinemas (known as therinas) can operate at 40% capacity.
  • Beaches are limited to 40 people per 1,000 square meters, with distance requirements between umbrellas and sunbeds; some beach clubs are allowing visitors to pre-book private cabanas. Beach bars and canteens can only offer take-away service of prepackaged food.

Iceland

Travel restrictions:

Health info:

  • Here is the C.D.C advisory.
  • Visitors must fill out a form before arriving in Iceland that asks for their contact information throughout their stay, and they are encouraged to download a contract-tracing app.
  • Travelers must be tested on arrival or quarantine for 14 days (not required for children born in 2005 or earlier). You must wait for your test results (promised within 24 hours) at your Reykjavik hotel. Anyone who tests positive will be isolated at a converted hotel. The tests will be free until July 1 and thereafter will cost ISK 15,000 (about $110).
  • All are encouraged to follow two-meter social distancing guidelines and wash hands frequently; masks are only recommended for those who are coughing or sneezing.

Local intel:

  • Most activities are allowed, so long as they abide by social-distancing guidelines and a ban on public gatherings of 500 people or more.
  • Restaurants, cafes, and bars are open under social-distancing rules; nightclubs and other businesses in Reykjavik must close by 11:00 p.m.
  • The Blue Lagoon has divided its hydrothermal baths into sections and is allowing in fewer guests to allow for two meters between groups.
  • Locals on the ground report that things have mostly gone back to normal.

Portugal

Travel restrictions:

  • Portugal, which had in June announced that it would soon open to U.S. travelers, is now following the E.U. guidelines that forbid U.S. residents from entering.
  • Here is the U.S. State Department advisory.

Health info:

  • Here is the C.D.C. advisory.
  • Masks are required in enclosed areas and crowded outdoor spaces.
  • Public transportation is limited to two-thirds capacity.

Local intel:

    • Travel companies can sign up for the Portugal Tourism Board’s Clean & Safe program, and may be subject to inspections to ensure compliance. Some are waiting for more travelers to arrive before bringing employees back from government-subsidized furloughs.
    • Restaurants must have at least two meters of space between tables. Menus are often available via smartphone. Many mid-level restaurants converted to take-away while restrictions on public life were in place and still aren’t offering table service.
    • Museums, theaters, and concert halls are open with reduced capacity. The front gate of the Pena Palace in Sintra is open as normal, but guards are restricting entry to the palace’s small rooms (after-hours visits are also available).
    • Capacity at beaches has been limited, with traffic-light-style signage installed to indicate which have available space (green), which are approaching capacity (yellow), and which are full (red); the same information will be available via an app. While all of Portugal’s beaches are open to the public, some hotels have strands that are more private because they are very difficult to access if you’re not staying there.
    • The Lisbon airport’s V.I.P. service will spare you the bus ride from your plane’s remote parking spot to the terminal, and whisk you through customs and immigration.

St. Martin/Sint Maarten

Travel restrictions:

  • Princess Juliana International Airport, which is on the Dutch side of the island, originally opened to flights from the U.S. on July 1. However, due to the rise in cases in the U.S., those flights are on hold once again and tentatively due to resume on August 1. Travelers are free to move between both sides of the island. 
  • Here are the U.S. State Department advisories for St. Martin (French side) and Sint Maarten (Dutch side).

Health info: 

  • Here are the CDC advisories for St. Martin and Sint Maarten
  • Visitors must complete a health declaration 72 hours prior to travel.
  • Arriving passengers must show proof of a negative RT-PCR COVID-19 test taken no more than 72 hours prior to the day of travel (children 10 and under are exempt). There are mandatory temperature checks on arrival; those showing symptoms will be tested at their own cost. 
  • Visitors are encouraged to adhere to proper social distancing. Masks are required for both passengers and staff inside the airport, but are not recommended elsewhere when two meters of distancing is possible. 

Local intel: 

  • Restaurants and beach bars that have reopened are encouraged to enact a number of health and safety measures, such as conducting temperature checks of employees and having them wear masks. 
  • Tour vehicles are limited to 50% capacity. 
  • Beaches are open with chairs spaced at least two meters apart. When such distancing cannot be maintained, beachgoers must wear masks. 
  • Bars and casinos are open with guidelines in place.

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