Make Your Next Trip Extraordinary

Thailand: Insider’s Guide to Chiang Mai, Chiang Rai, and the Best Beaches

Sandy Ferguson | November 17, 2016

The insider advice on this page is from one of Wendy’s Trusted Travel Experts for Southeast Asia: Sandy Ferguson of Asia Desk.

Trusted Travel Expert
Sandy Ferguson

Sandy was raised in Asia, attended high school in Bangkok, and in 1976 was one of the first guides to accompany travelers to the newly opened People’s Republic of China. He later returned to Thailand to open a tour company, establishing offices not only in Bangkok but in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia too. Now based in Atlanta, Sandy and his team craft tailor-made itineraries that cater to individual tastes and interests and make the most of your precious time. He knows what works best for travelers, and, just as important, what doesn’t. Asia Desk has a vast network of contacts in the hotel industry, translating into special treatment for his clients, and maintains complete control of every detail of a trip, right down to handpicking every guide—all dynamic locals whom Sandy considers family (some of them really are!). They are expert in—and passionate about—their destinations and turn what would otherwise be a great trip into the trip of a lifetime. Sandy was also included in Perrin’s People, Wendy’s award-winning list of top travel specialists, which was published annually in Condé Nast Traveler magazine from 2000 to 2013.

Travel arrangements start at $900 per person for two travelers; minimum booking requirement of $5,000 for land arrangements of two or more people. This is the minimum you should expect to pay.

Where to Stay and Eat

Best bang–for-your-buck hotels
137 Pillars House in Chiang Mai. This 30-suite boutique property, located in the heart of town, is a member of the Small Luxury Hotels of the World and has been beautifully restored. It has a small museum, a spacious lounge, a library, and a fine-dining restaurant, complete with a baby grand piano. The Rajah Brooke suites are a great call, but the Louis Leonowens Pool Suite is the ultimate in comfort. A popular activity at the hotel is the afternoon cooking school, which includes a visit to the midday market and preparation of a great three-dish lunch (usually Pad Thai noodles, chicken with cashews, and a green vegetable curry), with an apron and a certificate thrown in.

Best beach resorts
Globally renowned for its famous “Full Moon” festivities, Koh Phangan is also home to isolated hideaways ripe with the gifts of tranquility and abundant natural beauty (koh means island in Thai). Secluded on this island paradise, the Anantara Rasananda Koh Phangan Villa Resort & Spa is an oasis of 64 villas and suites set along the pristine sands of Tong Nai Pan Noi beach. Tucked amidst the gardens and sea, you may feel hundreds of miles away from the rest of the world, but the resort is only a 30-minute speedboat ride from nearby Koh Samui. For a full island cultural experience with a fabulous beach, Koh Lanta, off Krabi, is a great place to explore. The Pimalai Resort & Spa is the place to stay, and the hillside villas offer spectacular views. Spend a day kayaking through mangrove forest or exploring a marine park on a nearby island, then take the resort’s private fast boat to uninhabited Koh Haa to enjoy some snorkeling and a wonderful sunset!

Restaurant the locals love
The Whole Earth Restaurant in Chiang Mai. Although it is mostly vegetarian, it also serves some chicken and seafood dishes. It has been a consistent local favorite for years. Whole Earth has a warm, traditional feel to it (you take off your shoes to enter), and the baked-pineapple fried rice is both sweet and succulent and one of my favorite dishes.

Meal worth the splurge
The Service 1921 Restaurant & Bar, in the Anantara Chiang Mai Resort, is a splendid colonial house opened in 1921 as the British Consulate of Chiang Mai; the place reimagines this colonial era in an eccentric and fictitious reinvention of the British government’s secret intelligence service. The contemporary Thai, Szechuan, and Vietnamese dishes are created by expert chefs, and the array of dumplings is amazing!

Must-have dish
Khao soi, a simple northern Thai/Lao/Burmese–inspired curried chicken or beef soup with hearty wheat or rice noodles (much like spaghetti) and a surprising depth of flavor. It comes in many forms: Chiang Mai and Chiang Rai styles (the coffee shop at the Wiang Inn in Chiang Rai serves a great rendition) are the heartiest. The clear-soup style found in Luang Prabang is a bit lighter, uses minced meats, and is served at breakfast. The name means “cut rice” in most local dialects, because the dough for the rice noodles is spread out on a cloth stretched over boiling water. After steaming, the large sheet noodle is then rolled and cut with scissors. Be sure to throw in the deep-fried crispy egg noodles, pickled cabbage, shallots, and a squeeze of lime over it all before you attack a bowl of khao soi.

What to See and Do

Art at Mae Fah Luang, Chiang Rai, Thailand

Art at Mae Fah Luang, Chiang Rai, Thailand. Photograph by C. Kennerly

Don’t miss
Chiang Rai. With more than 60 artists’ studios in the province, it’s a great center for Thailand’s creative community. It’s also rich in history and was the site of the first Thai kingdom, which was established in 1328 along the Mekong River at Chiang Sean, where the city walls remain to this day.

Don’t bother
I’m sorry to say so, but overdevelopment has ruined most of Phuket and devastated the Phi Phi islands. Yes, there are nice places on Phuket, such as the Trisara and Andaman White Beach resorts, but as a whole, it’s way too Cancun for most people. If you’re looking for great beach resorts, go to Samui or Krabi Province instead (see “Best beach resorts,” above).

Hidden gems
The Rai Mae Fah Luang Museum (or simply “the Rai”), in the city of Chiang Rai, celebrates the Lanna art and culture of the north, which is distinct from that in the rest of Thailand. It features a huge eighteenth-century royal residence comprising 32 wooden structures and collections of both sacred and secular artifacts.

The Hall of Opium, in Chiang Sean, about an hour’s drive from Chiang Rai, is a world-class museum that every visitor to the Golden Triangle should see. There are no samples given after the tour, but you will come away with an in-depth understanding of the 5,000-year history of the drug and its significant impact on Thailand, China, and the rest of the region.

Sunday Market, Chiang Mai, Thailand

Sunday Market, Chiang Mai, Thailand. Photograph by C. Kennerly

Cheap thrill
The Chiang Mai “Street of Walking People,” as it translates from Thai. Every Sunday, rain or shine, most of Chiang Mai turns out for this market, which lasts from 4 p.m. until midnight, starting at Thapae Gate and running the length of Ratchadamnoen Road through the heart of the Old City. The street is closed entirely to vehicular traffic, allowing locals to meet, browse, socialize, haggle, and enjoy. The market is a real showcase of the art and craftsmanship of northern Thailand: Many of the stallholders, most of whom have other jobs, have personally made the items they sell. Food and drink are also available in glorious abundance, with vendors at a number of temples along Ratchadamnoen Road selling fabulous local treats cooked right before your eyes. You can enjoy your meal watching the street performers that include traditional musicians, Thai dancers, puppet shows, and even rock bands all along the route.

Bragging rights
In Chiang Mai, we can arrange for you to have a private, full-day walking tour of the old town with Becky Weldon Sithiwong, or “Khun Becky,” the first curator of the acclaimed Rai Mae Fah Luang Museum and a walking encyclopedia of Thai, Lanna, and Lao culture and languages. She has a master’s degree in museology from Amsterdam’s Reinwardt Academy, has worked for CARE and USAID, and opened Chiang Rai’s first guesthouse and art gallery. A day with Khun Becky can only be arranged by Asia Desk as part of a full trip, and is a day you’ll never forget.

Downtime
Do a spa experience in Thailand, even if it is just a foot massage at a corner stall. Thai spas are some of the world’s best at pampering, and you can really go all-out at some hotel spas and easily spend the whole day relaxing, steaming, and being wrapped, rubbed, and massaged. Just beware the traditional Thai massage, as the result can be painful and leave you not feeling well.

Contact Sandy

Best Times to Go

From mid-October (when the rains end) through February is an exceptional time to visit the northern part of the country, from Sukhothai through Chiang Mai and Chiang Rai; mid-November through January see the lowest temperatures and least humidity in Bangkok. The King’s Birthday, on December 5, ushers in the festive season (Christmas and New Year’s certainly aren’t traditional holidays here, but many Thais celebrate them anyway) and cooler, less humid weather.

In general, beaches are great from the end of December through March. Some beaches, such as those on Samui, are also acceptable in July and August, so be sure to check the beach in question.

Worst Times to Go

September is the wettest month of the year, but as every photographer knows, rain clears the air! Avoid most Thai beach resorts from August through November.

Avoid northern Thailand from mid-February through the first week of April because of smoke from agricultural burning, which is not very healthy and cuts visibility for photography (the past few years have been particularly bad).

Biggest Rookie Mistake

Not planning ahead. It can take considerable time to plan your trip and make arrangements after you’ve arrived. Make your arrangements well in advance or you’ll probably end up having a very commercial experience—most likely a group tour.

Scam Alert

Chiang Mai songthasews. Pronounced song-tau, these are trucks with covered flatbeds and two rows of facing benches that are a form of shared-ride transportation somewhere between a bus and a taxi. Drivers run semi-regular routes, picking up and dropping off passengers, and prices are supposed to be fixed. But when tourists are involved, drivers get greedy. Make sure you know where you are going, negotiate a price in advance, and if the driver starts heading in a direction that you know is not correct, get out.

Must-Have Apps

Google Translate will translate your text from English to Thai and from Thai to English. It is very easy to use and will probably come in handy if you are on your own, especially in the more rural areas of the country.

Airport Intel

Checking in at all of Thailand’s airports is easy, although the women who go through your carry-on bags in Bangkok are very conscientious about their jobs and confiscate lots of stuff—so be sure to know what is and isn’t permitted. Avoid the “freelance taxis” at all airports, and instead take a car service (there are stands in the arrivals hall) or a metered taxi from the taxi queue outside the arrivals area. If you’re not carrying too much baggage, the fast train from Bangkok’s Suvarnabhumi International Airport to the city center is an easy and convenient way to get to town. It connects to the Skytrain metro system and can save you time as you won’t have to contend with traffic.

Tipping Tips

Tipping in restaurants is not necessary since a 10 percent service fee is usually included. It’s very European in that respect. But an additional couple of bucks for service is always welcomed. In a taxi, round up to the nearest 100 baht, so if the meter reads 250 baht, give 300. If you have a guide for the day, the standard is 300 to 500 baht per person per day and drivers get half that, but tipping is at your discretion.

Don’t Forget to Pack

Plenty of hearty cotton handkerchiefs to wipe the sweat from your brow!

Instagram Moment

Doi Suthep, Chiang Mai. Early in the morning, the views from Doi Suthep, which is just 80 miles from the city center and 3,200 feet above the valley floor, are spectacular. Wat Phrathat Doi Suthep, the temple that sits atop the mountain, is also a stunner.

Perfect Souvenir

A Thai-style farmer’s shirt made of natural cotton and organic indigo dye. These are collarless shirts with three or four pockets and are worn untucked. They are comfortable and practical, and the fabric, known as mor hum, is lightweight but sturdy cotton that can be washed over and over again, looking better with each wash.

Reviews

Trip of a lifetime

Jill Totenberg | June 7, 2017

Spectacular from start to finish

Jill Totenberg | June 2, 2017

Went beyond traditional sightseeing

Greta Brendley | May 17, 2017
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