Make Your Next Trip Extraordinary

5 Ways To Get Your Child to Try New Foods When Traveling: A 12-Year-Old’s Advice

Charlie Baker | October 14, 2014

Hi. I’m Charlie. Now that I’m 12 years old, I often try new things without being told. Last year I tried jerk chicken in Jamaica, and it was amazing. Last summer I tried conch ceviche in Mexico and, even though it was a bit too limey for me, I felt relieved because at least I tried it and I could say I had eaten conch. But since little kids really don’t want to branch out and would rather just stick to cheese pizza and chocolate ice cream, here’s how to get younger kids to try new foods when they travel:

1. Take your kids to the grocery store in the foreign country.  If your kid picks out the food himself, he’ll want to try it. We found chocolate yogurt at the supermarket in Spain, and we ate a lot of it.

2. Promise your kid a treat if he tries a food you want him to try. Tell him that if he tries a bite, you’ll get him something he really wants—like ice cream.

3. Relate the weird food to something that your kid likes at home.  If he doesn’t want to try the food in Mexico, tell him it’s like Taco Bell. It’s actually much better than Taco Bell, but don’t say that to the child because then he won’t want to try it.

4. Tell your kid he won’t get another chance to try the food. He won’t be able to get that food anywhere else so, if he doesn’t try it now, he won’t be able to until the next time he goes to that country.

5. Have your kids cook the food themselves. Then they’ll want to eat it.  At Rosewood Mayakoba in Mexico we cooked dinner, and we ate all of it, including salsa and guacamole and fish with asparagus.

Cooking lesson, Rosewood Mayakoba, Mexico

At Rosewood Mayakoba, in the new outdoor cooking studio called the Chef’s Garden, Charlie and his brother learned how to make traditional Mexican recipes.

Sites and Apps

How to Find the Best Seat on the Plane

Wendy Perrin | August 25, 2014

Reviews

The Secret to Extraordinary Travel: Here’s Proof That The WOW List Works

Wendy Perrin | June 22, 2017

Travel Tips

Beating Jet Lag and Travel Exhaustion with Science and Magic

Yahoo! Travel | December 26, 2014

Airline Travel

An Easy Way to Improve Your Next Flight Delay: Airport Lounge Day Passes

Wendy Perrin | November 25, 2014

Philanthropic Travel

How One Travel Company Creates Meaningful Travel

Sara Tucker | January 25, 2016

let's create an extraordinary trip

California: Plan Your Trip!

Wendy Perrin | January 24, 2017

Cruises

How to Keep Your Kids Happy on a Cruise

Doug Baker | March 8, 2016

Ask Wendy

The Best Chip Credit Card for Travel in Europe

Wendy Perrin | April 14, 2014

Travel Tips

Is 2015 the Year to Travel to China?

Wendy Perrin | March 16, 2015

Travel Tips

The Three Most Important Things to Pack for China

Billie Cohen | March 31, 2016

Travel Tips

The Real Things You Should Be Wary Of When Traveling Abroad (Hint: It’s Not Terrorism)

Wendy Perrin | March 21, 2017

Family Travel

Shakespeare400: One More Reason You Should Be in the U.K. This Spring

Sara Tucker | February 17, 2016

1 Comment

  1. RobertKCole

    Our family rule was that the kids had to try everything. They did not need a full order, they did not need to eat all of it. They did not have to like it. They just had to try it.

    Sushi, Escargots, Hummus, Tapas, and Dim Sum are now all favorites.

    Now, in their teens & early 20’s, they are much less finicky than many of their friends, and they realize how much they would have been missing if they refused to be open minded and give something a try.

    They now play the role of introducing new cuisines to friends, or even kids that they babysit (the number of kids that initially refuse to eat vegetables, anything green, or survive solely on buttered noodles is sadly staggering…)

    Important Note: We also never made them try really funky stuff that we knew that they wouldn’t like, or made them eat something that we wouldn’t eat. Trust goes a long way. The more experience they have trying things, the less apprehensive they become.

    That family rule has served us well. The only downside is that the kids will always call out “family rule” if I pass on sampling someone’s hot & sour soup (that might look to me like it has too much corn starch…)

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>